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Mysterious outbound UDP traffic on port 8888… Help!

Mysterious outbound UDP traffic on port 8888… Help!

What is this traffic on port 8888? Or a device is infected and trying to communicate over port 8888 to IP addresses all over the world?!?! I’ve seen forum posts with similar titles a handful of times now and the final result is often someone discovering the Private Internet Access (PIA) client on a device or computer. I get a chuckle every time I see it because I was once in their shoes so I figured I would make a…

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Block Ads & Malvertising on pfSense Using pfBlockerNG (DNSBL)

Block Ads & Malvertising on pfSense Using pfBlockerNG (DNSBL)

This walkthrough uses the DNSBL portion of pfBlockerNG to remove ads/advertising and more importantly, malvertising. It essentially creates a functionality similar to the pi-Hole project except it doesn’t require a separate piece of hardware. Instead, you just use your pfSense + pfBlockerNG! Please note this walkthrough is for the new version of pfBlockerNG. Although the new version of pfBlockerNG is still in the development/experimental branch of pfSense firmware, I would suggest configuring it instead of the “stable” version… First, I…

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Block Ads & Malvertising on pfSense Using pfBlockerNG (DNSBL) – Old

Block Ads & Malvertising on pfSense Using pfBlockerNG (DNSBL) – Old

This walkthrough uses the DNSBL portion of pfBlockerNG to remove ads/advertising and more importantly, malvertising. It essentially creates a functionality similar to the pi-Hole project except it doesn’t require a separate piece of hardware. Instead, you just use your pfSense (pfBlockerNG)! I love pfSense and if I could only install one package to enhance its capabilities, it would undoubtedly be pfBlockerNG. pfBlockerNG is a pfSense package maintained by @BBcan177 (on Twitter). It’s worth mentioning that BBCan177 has a Patreon campaign where you…

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Redirect outgoing NTP traffic to an internal NTP server

Redirect outgoing NTP traffic to an internal NTP server

Tired of seeing outbound NTP blocks in your firewall logs because you restrict outgoing traffic? Or maybe you are receiving alerts because some device uses NTP pool resources (such as pool.ntp.org) and one of those IP addresses has ended up on a blacklist, blocklist, threat intelligence feed, etc? Either way, few things in the life of an IT or security professional are as frustrating as false positives. This write-up will help you change that with a little NAT magic, aka…

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Monitoring pfSense with Nagios Using SSH – part 3

Monitoring pfSense with Nagios Using SSH – part 3

Configuring the checks on Nagios XI This is the third and final part to monitoring pfSense with Nagios XI using SSH. If you missed either of the previous parts, I’ve included them below. Note: If you’re configuring this on Nagios Core, scroll down to the bottom of this page for the example commands.cfg and services.cfg files. Part 1: Setting up password-less SSH Part 2: Downloading and testing the checks Changelog 15Dec2017 – Originally posted 9May2018 – Added uptime and CPU…

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Monitoring pfSense with Nagios Using SSH – part 2

Monitoring pfSense with Nagios Using SSH – part 2

Downloading and testing the checks In the part 1, we setup password-less SSH. What good does that do? Now that we have a secure connection between the systems, we are quite a bit closer to securely running check commands using the SSH proxy on Nagios XI or the check_by_ssh on Nagios Core. Changelog 15Dec2017 – Originally posted 9May2018 – Added uptime and CPU temperature check as well as a Nagios Core example 11May2018 – Modified the check_pf_mem plugin 1June2018 –…

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Monitoring pfSense with Nagios Using SSH – part 1

Monitoring pfSense with Nagios Using SSH – part 1

Monitoring pfSense with Nagios XI or Core Using SSH Series This walkthrough will guide you through the process of monitoring your pfSense using SSH and Nagios. Though this was originally written with Nagios XI in mind, recent additions to this walkthrough have made the process far easier for those configuring it on Nagios Core. FWIW, the scripts could also be used with NRPE without issue, although I discuss why SSH is my preferred route below. The end of part 3…

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Configuring Quad9 on pfSense

Configuring Quad9 on pfSense

Quad9 is a DNS platform that adds several layers of security. It does this via standard DNS queries/responses.Basically, if a machine on your network queries a known bad hostname, the Quad9 DNS server responds by stating that domain does not exist (NX DOMAIN or non-existent domain). Quad9 also allows you to use DNS over TLS. If you would like a bit more info on Quad9 including some speed benchmarks against other DNS services, I would suggest an earlier article, Quad9 – First…

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Quad9 – First Thoughts & Benchmarks

Quad9 – First Thoughts & Benchmarks

Quad9 is the collaboration of IBM X-Force, PCH, and Global Cyber Alliance. It provides a DNS platform that combines high performance with security by blocking known malicious domains. At the time of this writing, Quad9 was using 19 threat feeds. I’m not going to get into the marketing speak because quite frankly, enough folks cover that well enough. Quad9 <- Main Site New “Quad9” DNS service blocks malicious domains for everyone <- Ars Technica Instead, I’ll provide the bare essentials…

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Sending pfSense logs to the DShield project

Sending pfSense logs to the DShield project

Changelog 02June2017 – Originally posted 28Nov2017  – Updated due to script changes What is DShield and why would I send them my logs? According to the SANS Internet Storm Center (ISC), “DShield provides a platform for users of firewalls to share intrusion information. DShield is a free and open service.” While DShield is often referred to generically as a “collaborative firewall log correlation system,” for all practical purposes, it is a bit of threat intelligence well before threat intelligence was…

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